Slip and Falls in Apartment Buildings

Slip and Falls in Apartment Buildings

Most slip and fall accidents in apartment buildings and apartment complexes occur as the result of a landlord’s negligence. Under Florida law, a landlord has a duty to maintain the premises and comply with applicable housing codes. A landlord or property management company who fails to maintain their property and address dangerous conditions that they knew or should have known about may be held liable for any injuries that result. 

Common Causes of Apartment Building Slip and Falls

Slip and fall accidents can occur inside an apartment, but they are most likely to occur in the common areas of an apartment complex. Common causes of apartment building slip and falls include:

  • Cracked pavement on sidewalks and parking lots. Cracked pavement or potholes in any area of an apartment complex can be hazardous.
  • Broken staircases and steps. When handrails and banisters become loose or broken, tenants going upstairs can lose their grip and fall. Steps that are worn, cracked, or loose can also pose a danger.
  • Torn carpet and flooring. Replacing worn carpeting and flooring can be expensive so often landlords fail to do so. Worn or torn carpeting and flooring can become tripping hazards for tenants and their guests.
  • Inadequate lighting. Insufficient lighting of stairways, parking lots, and hallways can lead to slip and falls if a tenant is unable to see a hazard and therefore cannot avoid it.
  • Wet floors. When proper mats are not used and wet surfaces are not kept dry, they can become dangerous conditions. In addition, if a landlord is made aware of a leaky roof or plumbing issues inside apartments and fails to fix them, they can be liable for slip and falls.
  • Pools. Broken pool decks or steps, slippery surfaces, and other dangerous conditions at the pool can cause serious injury.

Proving Liability in an Apartment Building Slip and Fall

In order to prove that a landlord was responsible for an apartment building slip and fall, it must be established that:

  • There was a dangerous condition
  • The landlord created the dangerous condition, was aware of the dangerous condition, or should have been aware of the condition through the exercise of reasonable diligence
  • The landlord could have repaired the dangerous condition or warned others of the existence of the dangerous condition
  • There was a likelihood that the dangerous condition could cause an injury if left unattended
  • The dangerous condition caused an injury

Contact an Experienced Florida Attorney

If you’ve been injured in a slip and fall accident in an apartment building or complex, you should have your case evaluated by an experienced and trusted personal injury attorney. The attorneys at Abrahamson & Uiterwyk have over 30 years of experience helping injured Floridians. Contact us onlineor call us at 1-800-753-5203 today to schedule your free consultation.